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What antibotics are safe for renal patients
02-02-2012, 05:46 PM
Post: #11
RE: What antibotics are safe for renal patients
yes i understand kh i have 5 docs i take Bactrim DS FOR 30 YRS BUT THEY HAVE ALWAYS SAID WHEN U R IN CKD IT CAN BE VERY HARMFUL TO UR KIDNEYS.. SULFAMETHOZOLE- SORRY MY COMPUTER IS IN THE SHOP THIS ONE IS A GONER. BRB

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02-04-2012, 06:21 AM
Post: #12
RE: What antibotics are safe for renal patients
Stupid doc just had me on arithimyacin. Oh well, I can not do anything about it now. Also, I am suffering from thrush. Because Ihave been on too many antibotics and all the good bacteria has been killed off.

006
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02-05-2012, 05:01 AM
Post: #13
RE: What antibotics are safe for renal patients
i take arithmyicin for yrs. off and on and z-pac is azithromycin and is also safe to use. every one is different and so is each infection with each infection and use of antibiotics r each different for each new or old infection and may not work with repeated use . theres is a NURSING BOOK FOR DRUGS 2012. I IMAGINE ITS ABOUT 18 -22 DOLLARS @ ANY GOOD BOOK STORE. AND MAYBE ONLINE. BUT SOME GET THE SYMPTOMS WHEN THEY READ ABOUT DIFFERENT MEDS.. LIKE MY FRIEND AFTER HE READS THE SIDE EFFECTS, HE GOT THEM ALL! SO WE TOOK THE BOOK AWAY. THIS WILL HELP U WITH ANY QUESTIONS REGARDING ANY DRUGS ON THE MARKET TODAY. THIS JUST NOT ONE AWNSER TO WHAT IS GOOD OR BAD SOMETIMES THERE'S NO CHOICE. SORRY, MY COMPUTOR IS BACK TODAY ) CAN'T GET ITALICS OFF HAHA AH WELL TAKE CARE

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02-05-2012, 05:55 PM
Post: #14
RE: What antibotics are safe for renal patients
Thanks Belle.

006
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02-06-2012, 02:48 PM
Post: #15
RE: What antibotics are safe for renal patients
KH,

This is listed under "Special Precautions" or Azithromycin: "•tell your doctor if you have or have ever had cystic fibrosis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), irregular heartbeat, or kidney or liver disease." Azithromycin is still a macrolide antibiotic which is not good for patients with renal failure however, your doctor may decide the benefit may outweight the risk of a certain antibiotic so its ALWAYS best to ask if the antibiotic would hurt your kidneys and what his reason is for that particular antibiotic if he/she says yes it is metabolized in kidneys.

Good Luck!
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02-06-2012, 04:06 PM
Post: #16
RE: What antibotics are safe for renal patients
all my pills r bad for me but they have no choice. and after 28 yrs there r just so much that doesn't work or what ever so sometimes u have to use a med or procedure, that will out weight some of the choices you could have used. as time has passed i have so many not much is left. best wishes and goodluck.

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02-06-2012, 04:09 PM
Post: #17
RE: What antibotics are safe for renal patients
Belle,

I totally agree that sometimes the doctors have no choice but to use certain antibiotics. Like I said, there're times when the benefit will outweigh the risk. I wish you all the luck in the world!

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02-07-2012, 07:53 PM
Post: #18
RE: What antibotics are safe for renal patients
Thanks Healthed pro.

I pray for blessings upon you Belle.

006
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01-26-2014, 03:20 AM (This post was last modified: 01-26-2014 03:54 AM by POLLUX.)
Post: #19
RE: What antibotics are safe for renal patients
(02-02-2012 12:20 PM)HealthEdPro Wrote:  KidneyHope,
Ok most of your antibiotics will process through the liver but there is a classification of drugs which are your "aminoglycosides" which are antibiotics that end in "cin". Streptomycin, Erythromycin, Gentamycin, and Garamycin to name a few. Additionally, certain combinations of drugs or drug/food combinations may also affect your kidneys. Broad spectrum antibiotics such as Cipro, Keflex, Amoxicillin, Azithromax, Bactrim should be relatively safer on your kidneys than the stronger "cin" medications. Most of the time those are prescribed when dealing with a drug resistant infection or superbug or last line of defense when you have tried other medications.

I hope that helps!

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Be advised that any sulphur based antibiotic such a Bactrim can be deadly for any patient with chronic kidney disease. Here are other criteria: any patient 66 years of age or older should not be given Bactrim without close supervision and monitoring, in particular serum potassium; any patient taking blood pressure medication, in particular ACE, ARB or beta blockers. You can check this out on the internet search CKD AND BACTRIM -or Bactrim's chemical name "trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole". The following are direct quotes: "Given the widespread use of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ACEIs, and ARBs in the general population, and more specifically among elderly patients with multiple risk factors for hyperkalemia, the clinical implications of our findings are considerable. Serious hyperkalemia can cause sudden death and is one of the most dangerous complications of therapy with ACEIs or ARBs. Consequently, strategies aimed at minimizing the risk of hyperkalemia are necessary corequisites of treatment. When possible, minimizing the use of drugs that further impair potassium excretion is essential. Our findings suggest that for patients receiving an ACEI or an ARB and for whom therapy with antibiotics is required, avoidance of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy may be prudent when other options exist. The mechanism by which the use of trimethoprim can precipitate hyperkalemia in users of ACEIs or ARBs is related to an amiloridelike inhibition of sodium channels in the luminal membrane of the distal tube. Consequently, sodium reabsorption and potassium secretion are impaired, resulting in an antikaliuretic effect that may predispose susceptible individuals to clinically important hyperkalemia.
In conclusion, we found that prescription of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole to elderly patients receiving therapy with either an ACEI or an ARB was associated with a major increase in the risk of hyperkalemia.

Quote #2: "Hyperkalemia is a potentially deadly adverse drug reaction, and TMP-SMX is one of the most commonly prescribed antibiotics in North America," Weir explains. "TMP-SMX can decrease the kidney's ability to remove potassium from the body. Potassium plays an important role in regulating heartbeat, and severe episodes of hyperkalemia can cause fatal disturbances in the heart rhythm."

Patients receiving TMP-SMX were more likely to develop dangerously high potassium levels, the study found. Weir says, "The risk of severe hyperkalemia is five times higher in patients prescribed TMP-SMX compared to those prescribed amoxicillin—another popular antibiotic to treat simple bladder infections."

Quote #3: Drug-Induced Hyperkalemia: Certain medications can also make it harder for your kidneys to remove potassium. This is particularly true if you have kidney disease or problems with the way your body handles potassium. Some medications may increase the amount of potassium in the body. Medications that have been linked to hyperkalemia include: Antibiotics, including penicillin G and trimethoprim (Bactrim). There are other quotes available but these should suffice as a warning.

In July 2013 I was prescribed Bactrim and had no idea about the dangers. It was prescribed by a urologist who my nephrologist's nurse made an appointment with for me as I stood there and listened. I was told to take the Bactrim twice per day (standard dosage) for fourteen days. On about the ninth day after sitting I arose and immediately was paralyzed - could not take a step forward or backward. I sat back down in disbelief. After a few moments of contemplation as to what I was going to do I arose again and this time was able to walk but most weakly and my balance was unstable. Being downstairs I crawled up the stairwell.

I entered the hospital with a serum potassium reading of 8. My serum creatinine was 5.6 and my eGFR was 10. When the staff doctor spoke with me he said speaking with someone with a potassium reading of 8 was not often, and treatment to clear this Bactrim out of my system was essential, and if that failed I was already a candidate for dialysis so that would be the next step if the potassium was lowered immediately. Of course several ekg's were also performed to make sure I didn't have a heart attack. In his words, the cause of my situation was the Bactrim and that I should never have been prescribed that antibiotic because of my chronic kidney condition alone. In consultation with a nephrologist the nephrologist confirmed his statement. It was after this two-plus days of hospitalization that I found confirmation of what the staff doctor had told me. This matter is now in the beginning stages of legal resolution.
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