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Helpful Food List For Dialysis Patients
09-16-2010, 01:59 PM (This post was last modified: 09-16-2010 02:01 PM by sunshine.)
Post: #1
Helpful Food List For Dialysis Patients
You will need to follow a dialysis diet if you are getting
dialysis (deye-AL-i-sis) treatment. The dialysis machine
removes wastes from your blood when your kidneys cannot
do this job. These wastes come from the foods you eat.
Wastes slowly build up in your blood between your dialysis
treatments. You can decrease the amount of these wastes by
following the dialysis diet.

A dialysis diet controls the amount of potassium, phosphorus,
sodium and liquid in your diet. The dialysis diet also provides
you with enough calories and protein to be healthy. Your
caregiver will help you plan a diet with the right amount of
phosphorus, potassium, sodium, fluid, and other nutrients for
you. If you need peritoneal (per-I-toh-NEE-al) dialysis, your
diet may not be as limited as a person who needs hemodialysis
(he-mo-deye-AL-I-sis). Your diet may need to change over time
based on your weight, blood test results, and other reasons.

You may also need to make other diet changes if you have other
health problems. These health problems may include diabetes,
heart disease, high blood pressure and other health conditions.

What can I do to make a dialysis diet part of my lifestyle?

Changing what you eat and drink may be hard at first. Following a
dialysis diet may help you feel better. Think of these changes as
"lifestyle" changes, not just "diet" changes. You will need to make
these changes part of your daily routine.

Choose a variety of foods on this diet to avoid getting tired of
having the same foods every day. Keep a list of items allowed
on this diet in your kitchen to remind you about the diet.

Carry a list of items allowed on this diet to remind you about the
diet when you are away from home. Tell your family or friends
about this diet so that they can help you follow the diet.

Ask your caregiver, a dietitian, or a nutritionist any questions you
may have about your diet plan. A dietitian or nutritionist works
with you to find the right diet plan for you.

What can I eat and drink while on a dialysis diet?

Ask your caregiver how much potassium, phosphorus, sodium,
liquid and protein you need in your diet. The food list below can
help you plan your meals.

Milk and dairy products:

The following servings of food have four grams of protein, 120
calories, 80 mg of sodium, 185 mg of potassium, and 110 mg of phosphorus.

One half of a cup of milk (fat free, low-fat, whole, buttermilk, or chocolate milk).

One-half of a cup of ice milk or ice cream.

One-half of a cup of plain or fruit-flavored yogurt.

Nondairy milk substitutes: These foods have one-half of a gram of protein, 140 calories,
40 mg of sodium, 80 mg of potassium, and
30 mg of phosphorus.

One-half of a cup of nondairy frozen dessert, or nondairy frozen
dessert topping.

One-half of a cup of nondairy creamer.

Meat and meat substitutes:

These foods have 7 grams of protein, 65 calories, 25 mg of sodium,
100 mg of potassium, and 65 mg of phosphorus. Do not use salt
when preparing these foods.

One ounce of beef, such as round, sirloin, T-bone, porterhouse
steak, rib, ground beef or ground chuck.

One ounce of pork such as fresh ham, tenderloin, chops, loin
roasts, or cutlets.

One ounce of lambchops, legs, or roasts.

One ounce of poultry, such as chicken, turkey, Cornish hen,
domestic duck, or goose.

One ounce of any fresh and frozen fish.

One ounce of lobster, scallops, shrimp, or clams.

One and one-half ounces of crab or oysters.

One ounce of canned tuna, unsalted canned salmon, or
unsalted sardines.

One large whole egg, or two large egg whites or yolks.

One-fourth of a cup of low-cholesterol egg product.

The following meats and meat substitutes are high in
sodium.
This means that they have 100-300 mg of sodium
in a serving.

You may need to avoid eating the following meats:

One ounce of deli-style roast beef, boiled or deli-style ham, or
deli-style chicken or turkey.

One ounce of canned salmon or sardines.

One-fourth of a cup of cottage cheese.

The following meats and meat substitutes are high in sodium, phosphorus,
or saturated fat. These foods should be avoided in
your diet:


All cheeses except cottage cheese.

Frankfurters, bratwurst, Polish sausage, and bacon.

Lunch meats including bologna, liverwurst, picnic loaf, salami,
summer sausage.

The following meats and meat substitutes are high in
potassium and phosphorus. These foods should be avoided:


Nuts and peanut butter.

Dried beans, peas, and lentils.

Starches:

These foods have 2 grams of protein, 90 calories, 80 mg of sodium,
35 mg of potassium, and 35 mg of phosphorus.

Breads and rolls:

One slice of bread (French, Italian, raisin, light rye, or sourdough white).

One-half of a hamburger or hot dog bun.

One-half of a small Danish pastry or sweet roll, without nuts.

One small dinner roll or hard roll.

One-half of an plain English muffin, or one-half of a small plain
bagel.

Two, six inch corn or flour tortillas.

Cereals and grains:

Three-fourths of a cup of most brands of ready-to-eat cereal.
(Some cereals are high in sodium).

Two cups of puffed rice.

One-half of a cup of cream of rice, cream of wheat, farina, or
cooked grits.

One-third of a cup of oat bran or oat meal.

One-half of a cup of cooked pasta such as noodles, macaroni, or spaghetti.

One-half of a cup of cooked brown or white rice.

Crackers and snacks:

Four saltine or round butter crackers.

Four graham crackers.

One and one-half cup of plain popped popcorn.

Nine tortilla chips. (This equals three-fourths of an ounce.)

One-fourth of an ounce of sticks or ring pretzels. (Salted pretzels
are high in sodium.)

Desserts:

Two inch square, or one and one-half ounces of cake.

Four sandwich cookies. (These cookies are high in sodium and phosphorus).

Ten vanilla wafers.

One-eighth of an apple, berry, cherry, or peach fruit pie.

One-half of a cup of sweetened gelatin.

The following are starches that are high in low-quality protein
and phosphorus. Do not eat these foods often. If you do eat them,
eat only small amounts.


Bran cereal or muffins, granola cereal or bars.

Boxed, frozen, or canned meals, entrees (main courses), or
side dishes.

Pumpernickel, dark rye, whole-wheat or oatmeal breads.

Whole-wheat crackers or cereals.

Vegetables:

These foods have 1 gram of protein, 25 calories, 15 mg of
sodium, and 20 mg of phosphorus. The amount of sodium listed
is for vegetables that are canned or prepared with no added salt.
One serving is one-half cup, unless another amount is given.


Low potassium (0-100 mg):

One cup of alfalfa sprouts.

Green or wax beans, and bean sprouts.

Raw cabbage.

Peeled cucumber.

All varieties of lettuce (one cup).

One green, sweet pepper.

Medium potassium (101-200 mg):

Five spears of asparagus.

Broccoli, cauliflower, eggplant, and onions.

One small raw carrot, or one stalk of raw celery.

One-half of a cup, or one-half of an ear of corn.

Fresh and canned mushrooms. (Mushrooms have 40 mg of
phosphorus or more, per serving.)

Green or snow peas. (Peas have 40 mg of phosphorus or more,
per serving.)

Raw spinach.

Summer squash.

High potassium (201-350 mg):

Artichoke, or cooked celery.

One-fourth of a whole avocado.

One chili pepper.

Unsalted or regular vegetable juice cocktail. (Regular vegetable
juice cocktail is high in sodium.)

Unsalted or regular tomato juice. (Regular tomato juice is high in sodium.)

One-fourth of a cup of tomato sauce.

One medium tomato.

High Potassium (201-350 mg) and more than 40 mg of
phosphorus:


Brussels sprouts or okra.

Potato, boiled, mashed.

Two tablespoons of tomato paste.

Fresh, cooked mushrooms.

Winter squash.

Very high potassium (more than 350 mg):

Hash browned potato.

Sweet potato. (Sweet potatoes have 40 mg of phosphorus
or more, per serving.)

One-fourth of a cup of beet greens.

One-half of a medium baked potato.

One ounce of potato chips (one ounce equals about 14 chips).

Cooked spinach. (Cooked spinach has 40 mg of phosphorus
or more, per serving.)

Fruits:

These foods have one-half gram of protein, 70 calories, and
15 mg of phosphorus. Each serving is one-half cup, unless
another amount is given.


Low potassium (0-100 mg):

Applesauce.

Blueberries.

One cup of cranberries or cranberry juice cocktail.

Canned pears.

Grape juice.

Medium potassium (101-200 mg)

One small apple (two and one-half inches across) or apple juice.

One fresh peach (two inches across).

Sweet or sour cherries.

Canned or fresh pineapple or fruit cocktail.

Grapes, strawberries, mango, or watermelon.

One-half of a small grapefruit, or grapefruit juice.

One tangerine (two and one-half inches across).

*High potassium (201-350 mg)

One cup of canned or fresh apricots or five dried apricots.

One small nectarine (two inches across).

One-half of a cup of orange juice, or one small orange.

One-eighth of a small cantaloupe.

One-fourth of cup of dates or two whole dried figs.

One medium fresh pear.

One-eighth of a small honeydew melon.

*Very high potassium (more than 350 mg)

One-half of a medium banana.

Prune juice, dried prunes, or canned prunes.

Fats:

These foods have very little protein, 45 calories, 55 mg of sodium,
10 mg of potassium, and 5 mg of phosphorus.


Unsaturated fats:

One teaspoon margarine or one tablespoon reduced calorie margarine.

One teaspoon mayonnaise or one tablespoon low-calorie mayonnaise.

One teaspoon oil: safflower, sunflower, corn, soybean, olive, peanut, canola.

Two teaspoons salad dressing, mayonnaise type.

One tablespoon salad dressing, oil type.

Two tablespoons low-calorie salad dressing.

One and one-half teaspoons tartar sauce.

Saturated fats:

One teaspoon butter.

Two tablespoons coconut.

One tablespoon powdered coffee whitener.

One teaspoon solid shortening.

High-calorie foods:

These foods have very little protein, 100 calories, 15 mg of
sodium, 20 mg of potassium, and 5 mg of phosphorus.

Liquids: (Be sure to include these liquids when adding up the
amount of liquids allowed for a day.)


One cup of a soda-type liquid: Ginger ale, lemon-lime.

One cup of a fruit-flavored drink, limeade, or lemonade.

One cup of cranberry juice cocktail.

Frozen deserts: (Be sure to include these liquids when adding
up the amount of liquids allowed for a day.)


One-half of a fruit ice bar.

One three ounce juice bar.

One-half cup of sorbet.

Candy and sweets:

Four pieces of hard candy.

Ten jelly beans.

Two fruit rolls.

One-fourth cup of cranberry sauce or relish.

Five large marshmallows.

Two tablespoons brown or white sugar, marmalade, jam or
jelly, syrup, honey.

Salty foods:

These foods have 250 mg of sodium.


One-eighth of a teaspoon of seasoned salt such as onion or
garlic salt.

Two tablespoons of barbecue sauce.

One and one-half tablespoons of ketchup.

One and one-half tablespoons of chili sauce.

One-sixth of a large dill pickle.

Four teaspoons of mustard.

Two medium green olives or three large black olives.

One-fourth of a teaspoon of soy sauce.

Two and one-half teaspoons of steak sauce.

One and one-fourth teaspoons of teriyaki sauce.

Liquids:

These liquids may be included in your diet. Be sure to include
these liquids when adding up the amount of liquids allowed for
a day.


Non-cola sodas (ginger ale, lemon-lime sodas).

Ice.

Lemonade or limeade.

Water or mineral water.

These liquids have some potassium or phosphorus in them.
Avoid these liquids, or drink only small amounts.

Colas and pepper-type sodas.

Beer and wine.

Coffee, regular or decaffeinated.

Fruit-flavored drinks with added vitamin C.

Tea.

Thirst-quencher liquids.

These liquids are very high in sodium or potassium and
should be avoided.


Broth or bouillon.

Consomme.

Salt-free broth or bouillon which are made with salt substitute (potassium chloride).

What other diet guidelines should I follow?

Any food that contains liquid, such as soup, must be added in
the amount of liquid that you may have each day. Any food that
melts when it is not cold, such as gelatin or ice cream, must also
be counted.

Ask your caregiver if you should make other diet changes because
of other health problems you may have. You may need to take a
vitamin and mineral supplement (pill). Your caregiver will
recommend the right vitamin and mineral supplement for you
if you need one.

You may need to stop using salt substitutes because they also
contain potassium.

Eat high fiber foods to avoid becoming constipated.
Constipation is having dry, hard stools that are difficult
to pass. High fiber foods include vegetables and fruits,
whole grains (whole wheat bread and bran cereals) and
legumes (beans, lentils).
Eat only the amounts of high fiber foods suggested by your
caregiver to avoid getting too much potassium, phosphorus
and sodium.

~The most important things in the world
were accomplished by people who have
kept on trying when there seemed to be
no hope left~
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09-16-2010, 04:00 PM
Post: #2
RE: Helpful Food List For Dialysis Patients
Also davita.com have a good recipes and food section which you can look up things that are good and bad. A renal diet is a bit counterintuitive - so what used to be seen as good - like whole grains and lots of fruit etc, are now seen as bad.
Sometimes you feel like there's nothing at all you're allowed, but in fact you are allowed everything - just some things aren't worth it, so you learn to work out another way. For me for example, I LOVE potatoes - so I have gotten used to peeling them early in the day, chopping them up and soaking them in cold water. If I have an urge for a glass of milk then I'll drink black coffee for the day to make up for it. You get used to reading blood test results and you can base a lot of what you do around that. if my pot/phos is high, then I watch my diet more closely for a week and it comes back down...then I usually get slack again and careless untill the next time it's a bit high and I try harder again.
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09-17-2010, 07:31 AM
Post: #3
RE: Helpful Food List For Dialysis Patients
yes it can be really hard my labs r very good and darn near perfect for clearance better than they have for 20 yrs but my calcium stays @ 9.2 i don't have milk. yogert ect ever so i wondered why?

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09-17-2010, 08:12 AM
Post: #4
RE: Helpful Food List For Dialysis Patients
there's rice milk, which is not too bad, this is what my son
substituted rather than having dairy.

~The most important things in the world
were accomplished by people who have
kept on trying when there seemed to be
no hope left~
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09-18-2010, 10:45 PM
Post: #5
RE: Helpful Food List For Dialysis Patients
(09-17-2010 07:31 AM)deb54 Wrote:  yes it can be really hard my labs r very good and darn near perfect for clearance better than they have for 20 yrs but my calcium stays @ 9.2 i don't have milk. yogert ect ever so i wondered why?

I don't know why this happens Deb - sometimes my potassium will be high, and I'll actually have not eaten anything for days. i think sometimes your body reacts in funny ways when it is missing something.
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09-19-2010, 09:16 AM
Post: #6
RE: Helpful Food List For Dialysis Patients
(09-18-2010 10:45 PM)Hanify Wrote:  
(09-17-2010 07:31 AM)deb54 Wrote:  yes it can be really hard my labs r very good and darn near perfect for clearance better than they have for 20 yrs but my calcium stays @ 9.2 i don't have milk. yogert ect ever so i wondered why?

I don't know why this happens Deb - sometimes my potassium will be high, and I'll actually have not eaten anything for days. i think sometimes your body reacts in funny ways when it is missing something.

that too and also Some medications, salt replacements, and low
sodium foods are especially high in potassium.

~The most important things in the world
were accomplished by people who have
kept on trying when there seemed to be
no hope left~
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01-27-2012, 10:12 AM (This post was last modified: 01-27-2012 10:16 AM by belle_starr.)
Post: #7
RE: Helpful Food List For Dialysis Patients
yes they all do, except for me i get dehydrated @ a drop of a hat and have good out go figure? and drop all electrolytes, ,mag not calcium! so now they said i don't need dialysis" but 8 mons off but so far so good : ) welcome to kidney friends

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